Upcoming HBCSE events [26/11/2017 onwards]


27Mon

Ph.D. Thesis Seminar of Ms. Anveshna Srivastava

Starts on: Monday, 27 November 2017, 11:00:00 am
Ends on: Monday, 27 November 2017, 12:30:00 pm

Venue: Main Building Lecture Room - G1

Coordinator: Prof. Sugra Chunawala

Ph.D. Thesis Seminar of Ms. Anveshna Srivastava Room No. 202

28Tue

Physics Olympiad Exposure Camp

Starts on: Tuesday, 28 November 2017, 9:00:00 am
Ends on: Friday, 01 December 2017, 5:30:00 pm

Venue: NIUS Building Lecture Hall - G4

Coordinator: Dr. Pravin Pathak

Physics Olympiad Exposure Camp

30Thu

Thursday Seminar on "Early to Bed, Early to Rise...?"

Starts on: Thursday, 30 November 2017, 3:30:00 pm
Ends on: Thursday, 30 November 2017, 4:30:00 pm

Venue: Main Building Lecture Room - G1

Coordinator: Prof. Jyotsna Vijapurkar

Speaker:

Dr. Deepti Gupta, HBCSE

Abstract:

In the age of personal gadgets streaming into our sleep time, the Nobel prize for research on the body’s clock, or circadian rhythms, could hardly be more timely. First identified in fruit flies, the tiny molecular components of the clock are at work in all multicellular life including humans. Circadian rhythms control when we’re relatively more active physically and mentally each day, keeping our lives ticking in time with Earth’s day/night cycle. This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three American scientists, Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash of Brandeis University and Michael Young of Rockefeller University, for their almost fifty years of work, on how time is measured each day in biological systems. The internal body clock allows an organism to anticipate the rising and setting of the sun, rather than simply reacting to it. The de-synchronizing of the body clock with the solar day cycle has now been linked to metabolic disorders, cancers, problems in cognition, Alzheimer's and several other issues in humans. The research on the other hand has informed policy makers to allow for appropriate actions such as desirable working hours (daylight saving) or the suitable time to learn for adolescents. It has also fostered the growth of a new field of research : “Chronomedicine”, which deals with prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in humans with a particular focus on the role "time" plays in our physiology, endocrinology, metabolism and behavior at many organizational levels.

11Mon

INMO RGC

Starts on: Monday, 11 December 2017, 9:00:00 am
Ends on: Thursday, 14 December 2017, 6:00:00 pm

Venue: Main Building Committee Room - 203

Coordinator: Dr. Prithwijit De

INMO RGC

13Wed

Felicitation Function of IJSO 2017

Starts on: Wednesday, 13 December 2017, 9:00:00 am
Ends on: Wednesday, 13 December 2017, 5:00:00 pm

Venue: NIUS Building Lecture Hall - G4

Coordinator: Dr. P. K. Joshi

Felicitation Function of IJSO 2017

21Thu

Thursday Seminar 1 on "Poverty, race and class in South African public education"

Starts on: Thursday, 21 December 2017, 3:30:00 pm
Ends on: Thursday, 21 December 2017, 4:15:00 pm

Venue: Main Building Lecture Room - G1

Coordinator: Prof. Jyotsna Vijapurkar

Speakers:

Profs Rajendra Chetty

Abstract:

Social reproduction theories highlight extensively the role of schooling in maintaining and perpetuating marginalization and socializing children in ways that reproduce class structures. Bourdieu’s (1990) notion of social and cultural capital is an attribute used in schools to reward students who have high social capital (as defined by society) and punish those who have low (as in poor students). South Africa is a world apart and the metaphor is extended into two education ‘systems’. The second school system, enrolls the vast majority of poor and working-class children whose health, economic and community difficulties concomitant with equally deficit schools produce learners that read mostly at the functional level, write without fluency or confidence and use inappropriate concrete techniques with numeric operations. The Poverty and Literacy Research Unit engages with literacy issues in poor schools and key projects of the Unit will be highlighted in the presentation.

About the speaker:

Rajendra Chetty is Research Chair in Poverty and Literacy at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology. He is a postcolonial scholar and currently serves as President of the English Academy of Southern Africa. He was awarded the 2015/16 Fulbright Scholarship as visiting professor to leading universities in the United States. His research areas include postcolonial writings, race, class, literacy and social issues in Education. He received the 2016 Medal of Honour from the Education Association of South Africa in recognition of his outstanding service to education over a sustained period of time.

21Thu

Thursday Seminar 2 on "Literacy, the ability to read and write: Rights to Food, Housing, Culture, Identity and Freedom of Thought"

Starts on: Thursday, 21 December 2017, 4:15:00 pm
Ends on: Thursday, 21 December 2017, 5:00:00 pm

Venue: Main Building Lecture Room - G1

Coordinator: Prof. Jyotsna Vijapurkar

Speaker:

Prof. Jaspal Kaur Singh

Abstract:

Literacy means the ability to read and write for all, although, according to the US National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), the percentage of students reading at a proficient rate is lower for students from minority groups and from poor communities. High school seniors scoring at or above proficiency levels on reading according to their race is as follows: Caucasian at 43%, Hispanics at 20% and Blacks at 16% (The Nations Report Card, 2007). When we add income disparity to the racial component, the discrepancy becomes significant and more students from these groups are likely to drop out of school; the result of not achieving high school diplomas or certification in higher education is poor paying jobs. Due to lack of basic education, the vicious cycle of poverty, and the subsequent criminalization of it, continues for many even in industrialized nations, such as the US. What are the relevant social and cultural contexts for achieving proficiency in reading and writing for all? How do we support students who are multilingual and bilingual and speak English as a second language? In terms of race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality, how is literacy disseminated for various students? One of the reasons cited by many scholars for students’ lack of engagement with reading is deficiency of pedagogies for critical thinking and writing within a multicultural classroom. For literacy to be sound and successful, the cultural contexts of reading and writing as well as pedagogical goals need to be addressed.

Barbara Ehrenreich in her introduction to The Poor Get Prison: The Alarming Spread of the Criminalization of Poverty, writes, “The poor, and especially poor people of color, have long been over- represented in the prison population . . . a simple traffic violation – such as a broken tail-light – can bring down a cascade of fees and fines, which mount quickly if not paid on time and can lead to incarceration.” Many in the US seem to suggest that the reason the majority of youth and adults from minority communities are incarcerated is due to their inability to read or write. The criminalization of poverty, its relationship to lack of literacy in minority communities, and strategies for multicultural literacies will be addressed in this presentation.

About the speaker:

Jaspal Kaur Singh is Professor of English at Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan. A postcolonial literature and theory scholar, Jaspal received the Fulbright Nehru Award in 2012-2013, the Northern Michigan University Distinguished Faculty Award in 2012-2013 and the Peter White Scholar Award 2013-2014. Her publications include: a monograph, Representation and Resistance: Indian and African Women Writers at Home and in the Diaspora; three coedited anthologies: Negotiating Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Turkey; Indian Writers: Transnationalisms and Diasporas; and Trauma, Resistance, Reconciliation in Post-1994 South African Writing.