14-10-2021  Thursday

23 August to 30 December, 2021

Philosophy of Education

Every Monday (11:00-13:00), Thursday (11:00-13:00)

Venue: Online Meeting/Video Conferencing

Coordinator: Dean's Office

Core Course

Instructors:

Ayush Gupta and Tathagata Sengupta

Course Day and Time:

Monday and Thursday (11 AM to 1 PM)

Starting from August 23, 2021

14Thu

Thursday Seminar on "On four different senses of embodiment in science education"

Date: 14 October, 2021
Time: 15:30 - 16:30

Venue: Online Meeting/Video Conferencing

Coordinator: Dr. Mashood K. K.

Speaker:

Magdalena Kersting, University of Oslo, Norway

Zoom link:

https://zoom.us/j/94058085713?pwd=QjY3TWpKUC84TFhldkdlS01ScnVGdz09

Meeting ID:

940 5808 5713

Passcode:

967696

Abstract:

What is the role of the human body in science education? Although science education researchers argue that thinking about and understanding science needs embodiment both in concrete and in more abstract learning domains, the role of the body has been approached from a variety of sometimes conflicting perspectives. In this talk, I wish to present a comprehensive overview of the various ways the body bears on science learning. Drawing on phenomenology and ecological psychology, I disentangle critical ideas of embodiment and embodied cognition to propose four senses of embodiment. These senses conceptualise the body in physical, phenomenological, ecological, and interactionist terms. By illustrating the relevance of the four senses in science education, I show that embodiment bears on practical educational problems and has various theoretical implications in science education. I conclude with suggestions for future research that realises the full potential of embodiment in science education.

Short Bio:

Magdalena Kersting is a science education researcher at the University of Oslo in Norway. In her research, Magdalena studies how learners understand and experience abstract knowledge in digital and virtual learning environments in formal and informal learning contexts. She has a particular interest in embodied learning processes and the domain of Einsteinian physics education.